• yatri gulaak

Iceland:Mývatn, Goðafoss and Akuryeri

Updated: Dec 20, 2020

Among the various lakes that indent north eastern Iceland, Myvatn is the most spectacular. Here, covert warfare among various geological forces, sometimes manifests itself in form of shapeshifting columns of milky white steam or turquoise lakes hidden in forbidding calderas. An infinitesimal quantum of these monumental forces is enough to power Iceland’s largest power plant i.e. Krafla power station.

La Strada
Geological forces sometimes manifest themselves in form of shapeshifting columns of steam
Krafla Power Plant

Adjoining the power station is a portal to Niflheim called Viti Crater. “Viti” means hell in Icelandic although it does not look anything like that. A serene, innocuous crater lake is nestled inside it, reflecting the cerulean skies above. Tourists resembling an army of ants marched on the edges of the crater.

"Viti” means hell in Icelandic although it does not look anything like that.
Tourists resembling an army of ants marched on the edges of the crater.

Just along the road we saw this deep blue body of water. It was not the famous Myvatn baths as it was small in size and empty on a beautiful day.

At a short distance from Krafla is the Myvatn Lake. Its nutrient rich waters, attract waterbirds and midges alike. We spent 15 minutes admiring the Hverfjall on the opposite shore before a swarm of midges started spiralling all around us. It was bit of a downer that we could not see all the attractions of Myvatn area. Even the ones we saw, we did not see them to our heart's fill. If we ever come back to Iceland again this is one area where we would like to spend a generous amount of time. At that instance however we had to be content with cursory glances of utterly unreal scenery. Pangs of remorse still prick our memory when we think about this place. Another strange formation was that of Vindbelgur, a black volcanic mountain that looked like a giant Shivalinga.

Hverfjall caldera
Vindbelgur

On the way to Akureyri, we also came across the magnificent Goðafoss (waterfall of the gods). Folklore says that law speaker of Alpingi in 1000 AD Thorgeir Ljosvetningagodi, was facing an inner conflict. A choice between adopting Christianity or sticking to old religion of his forefathers had to be made to avoid a civil war. Christianity was chosen and Thorgein himself converted. It must have been from this crag that he threw the idols of Odin, Thor , Loki , Freya etc., into the raging torrents of waterfall, for a watery grave.


When we finally got our first views of Akureyri, a wreath of fog bisected the scene in a strange fashion. The waters of Lake Akureyri sparkled in the waning light of evening sun. The second largest city of Iceland was nestled comfortably under the chain of mountains in its backdrop. We had to spent our night here.

Approach to Akuryeri
A wreath of fog bisected the scene in a strange fashion

120 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All